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Should I Roll My 401k into My New 401k or into an IRA?

A reader writes in, asking

“If I’m leaving my employer to take a new position, how should I determine whether to roll my current 401K into the new 401K or into an IRA?”

If you have already decided that you do want to roll your 401(k) somewhere else (e.g., because the old 401(k) has very expensive investment options), there are a handful of factors to consider. Not coincidentally, those factors are very similar to the factors considered when determining whether to roll a 401(k) over to an IRA in the first place.

Where Do You Have Better Investment Options?

If your new employer-sponsored plan has investment options that are better than what you’d have access to in a regular IRA, rolling your money into the new employer plan can be advantageous. Common examples would be people starting a job with the federal government (and who would therefore have access to the super-low-cost Thrift Savings Plan) or people whose new employer plan includes something like Vanguard Institutional share classes (i.e., Vanguard funds with lower costs than Admiral shares).

When Do You Plan to Retire?

If you separate from service with a given employer in or after the year in which you reach age 55, you can take penalty-free distributions from that employer’s 401(k) plan, whereas normally you have to wait until age 59.5 (unless you meet one of a few other exceptions).

As such, if you plan to retire in or after the year you turn 55 but before you turn 59.5, having more money in your final employer’s 401(k) may make it easier to meet your living expenses without having to find another exception to the 10% penalty. If you expect to be in such a scenario (e.g., because you’re age 50 right now when you’re switching jobs and you expect to retire 5-6 years from now), rolling your current 401(k) into your new 401(k) could be advantageous.

Are You Planning Roth Conversions?

If you are planning Roth conversions in your traditional IRA (or you have already done one this year) and your traditional IRA includes amounts from nondeductible contributions (e.g., because you’re executing a “backdoor Roth” strategy), then it can be wise to avoid rolling 401(k) money into a traditional IRA, because doing so would increase the amount of tax you’d have to pay on your conversions.

This wouldn’t necessarily mean, however, that you should roll your old 401(k) into the new 401(k). It might just mean that you should temporarily leave your old 401(k) where it is, with the plan to roll it into an IRA in some future year (e.g., the year after the year in which you do your last Roth conversion).

Expecting a Lawsuit?

I don’t write about this often, as it’s distinctly outside my area of expertise, but in some cases money in a 401(k) may have better protection from creditors than money in an IRA. So if you are expecting to be sued — or you work in a field where lawsuits are common — you should speak with a local attorney to discuss whether your money would be safer in a 401(k) than in an IRA.

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