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What *Didn’t* Change as a Result of the New Tax Law?

Quick book-related update: The 2018 edition of Social Security Made Simple is now available (print version here, Kindle version here). The changes are minor, so I’m using the same ISBN as the 2017 edition, which means that the Amazon page will still show the 2017 publication date.

And the writing is finished for the 2018 edition of Taxes Made Simple. My estimate is that the book will be available in roughly 2-3 weeks.

The single topic that readers have asked about most often over the last month or so has been the new deduction for pass-through business income. To my surprise though, there has been another type of email that has been even more common: questions about various things that haven’t changed at all. That is, people want confirmation that certain things weren’t changed by the broad new tax law.

“Is Social Security taxation changing?” (Nope.)

“Has the premium tax credit changed?” (Nope.)

And so on.

So, with that in mind, here’s a non-exhaustive list of things that are essentially unchanged as a result of the new law. (I say “essentially” unchanged, because many of these these deductions/credits/etc. involve dollar amounts that are inflation-adjusted each year. And, going forward, they will be adjusted based on chained CPI-U rather than CPI-U.)

  • The calculation that determines how much of your Social Security benefits are taxable
  • Retirement accounts (aside from the new inability to recharacterize — undo — a Roth conversion)
  • Cost basis tracking/reporting (i.e., the proposed change that would have forced people to use the FIFO method for identifying shares did not occur)
  • The step-up in cost basis that occurs when property is inherited
  • The 3.8% net investment income tax
  • The 0.9% additional Medicare tax for high earners
  • Medicare and Social Security taxes in general (including self-employment tax)
  • Health Savings Accounts (HSAs)
  • Deduction for self-employed health insurance
  • Deduction for student loan interest
  • Itemized deduction for charitable contributions
  • American Opportunity Credit
  • Lifetime Learning Credit
  • Child and dependent care credit (not to be confused with the child tax credit, which has changed, and which in some cases can now be claimed for dependents other than your children)
  • Retirement savings contribution credit
  • Premium tax credit
  • Earned income credit
  • Credit for purchasing a plug-in electric drive vehicle
  • Residential energy credit (for purchasing solar panels or a solar hot water heater for your home)

Hopefully, this should wrap up our discussion of the new tax law — at least for now. I’m looking forward to discussing some non-tax topics in upcoming articles.

For More Information, See My Related Book:

Book6FrontCoverTiltedBlue

Taxes Made Simple: Income Taxes Explained in 100 Pages or Less

Topics Covered in the Book:
  • The difference between deductions and credits,
  • Itemized deductions vs. the standard deduction,
  • Several money-saving deductions and credits and how to make sure you qualify for them,
  • Click here to see the full list.

A testimonial from a reader on Amazon:

"Very easy to read and is a perfect introduction for learning how to do your own taxes. Mike Piper does an excellent job of demystifying complex tax sections and he presents them in an enjoyable and easy to understand way. Highly recommended!"
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